Methods Results And Discussion

In the first study a nation wide random sample of 702 mothers with a child between 6 and 36 years of age were interviewed about duration of breast-feeding, current feeding practices, and factors which potentially could influence breast-feeding duration.

The ongoing study is carried out in the capital Vilnius. Infants are followed from birth to 12 months with home visits at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. At each visit the mother is asked about breast-feeding and when complementary foods were introduced. We present data for the first 165 infants who turned 6 months old before September 1999.

Breast-feeding rates in 1991/92and 1998/99are compared in the figure. The rates are not very different except for some longer duration of almost exclusive breast-feeding (i.e. infants drinlung water/tea/juice in addition to breast-milk) during the first 3 months in 1991/92.No data are available on exclusive breast-feeding in 1991/92.

age (months)

Figure 1. Breast-feeding rates in 1991192 and 1998199. (The three solid lines (the 1998/99 study) divide the infants into exclusively, almost exclusively, partially and not breast-fed. The two dashed lines (the 1991192 study) divide the infants into almost exclusively, partially or not breast-fed.)

age (months)

Figure 1. Breast-feeding rates in 1991192 and 1998199. (The three solid lines (the 1998/99 study) divide the infants into exclusively, almost exclusively, partially and not breast-fed. The two dashed lines (the 1991192 study) divide the infants into almost exclusively, partially or not breast-fed.)

In the 199 1/1992-year-study duration of breast-feeding was strongly associated with mother's age (< 20 y, mean 2.3 months; > 31 y, 4.8 months; p=0.009), and duration of mother's education (p<0.00001) and negatively with smoking (p=0.05). There was no association with parity, time span since the last delivery and mother's employment status.

Breast-feeding rates are still low and there is no sign of an increasing trend. Exclusive breast-feeding is rare. The results suggest that support of breast-feeding is not sufficient, and that it is especially the youngest mothers and those having the lowest education who need more information and support.

New Mothers Guide to Breast Feeding

New Mothers Guide to Breast Feeding

For many years, scientists have been playing out the ingredients that make breast milk the perfect food for babies. They've discovered to day over 200 close compounds to fight infection, help the immune system mature, aid in digestion, and support brain growth - nature made properties that science simply cannot copy. The important long term benefits of breast feeding include reduced risk of asthma, allergies, obesity, and some forms of childhood cancer. The more that scientists continue to learn, the better breast milk looks.

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