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Neuro Slimmer System Gastric Surgery Hypnosis

Neuro-Slimmer System Gastric Banding Hypnotherapy Program

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Figure 26-20 Disruption of hiatal hernia repair associated with postoperative gastric dilatation (arrows indicate the esophagogastric junction). A, Preoperative barium swallow showing a small recurrent hiatal hernia. B, Postoperative barium swallow 1 week after Belsey Mark IV repair showing a satisfactory intra-abdominal distal esophageal segment but also gastric dilation and delayed gastric emptying. C, After 2 months (left) and 4 months (right), the repair has progressively disrupted. The early postoperative delayed gastric emptying, most likely due to inadvertent injury to the vagus nerves, should have been treated with a gastric drainage procedure to minimize the chance of disruption of the repair and recurrence of the hernia. (From Orringer, M.B.: Complications of esophageal surgery and trauma. In Greenfield, L.J. [ed.]: Complications in Surgery and Trauma. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1984, p. 274, with permission.)

Figure 26-20 Disruption of hiatal hernia repair associated with postoperative gastric dilatation (arrows indicate the esophagogastric junction). A, Preoperative barium swallow showing a small recurrent hiatal hernia. B, Postoperative barium swallow 1 week after Belsey Mark IV repair showing a satisfactory intra-abdominal distal esophageal segment but also gastric dilation and delayed gastric emptying. C, After 2 months (left) and 4 months (right), the repair has progressively disrupted. The early postoperative delayed gastric emptying, most likely due to inadvertent injury to the vagus nerves, should have been treated with a gastric drainage procedure to minimize the chance of disruption of the repair and recurrence of the hernia. (From Orringer, M.B.: Complications of esophageal surgery and trauma. In Greenfield, L.J. [ed.]: Complications in Surgery and Trauma. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1984, p. 274, with permission.)

Figure 26-21 A, Asymptomatic partial migration of the fundoplication into the chest through the diaphragmatic hiatus 1 week after a Collis-Nissen hiatal hernia repair (arrow indicates the portion of fundoplication above the diaphragm). Although asymptomatic, this patient was reoperated on, the fundoplication was reduced and secured below the diaphragm, and the hiatus was narrowed further to prevent later potential complications of this paraesophageal hernia. B, After reduction of the fundoplication, the upper silver clips at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus and the lower set of silver clips at the end of the gastroplasty tube ("neoesophagus") define the length of the fundoplication, which is now below the diaphragm. (From Orringer, M.B.: Complications of esophageal surgery and trauma. In Greenfield, L.J. [ed.]: Complications in Surgery and Trauma. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1984, p. 275, with permission.)

Figure 26-21 A, Asymptomatic partial migration of the fundoplication into the chest through the diaphragmatic hiatus 1 week after a Collis-Nissen hiatal hernia repair (arrow indicates the portion of fundoplication above the diaphragm). Although asymptomatic, this patient was reoperated on, the fundoplication was reduced and secured below the diaphragm, and the hiatus was narrowed further to prevent later potential complications of this paraesophageal hernia. B, After reduction of the fundoplication, the upper silver clips at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus and the lower set of silver clips at the end of the gastroplasty tube ("neoesophagus") define the length of the fundoplication, which is now below the diaphragm. (From Orringer, M.B.: Complications of esophageal surgery and trauma. In Greenfield, L.J. [ed.]: Complications in Surgery and Trauma. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1984, p. 275, with permission.)

Figure 26-22 Migration of the Angelchik prosthesis (arrow) with resultant acute dilation of the gastric fundus. This patient presented with acute upper abdominal pain and required emergent removal of the prosthesis and a fundoplication to control the gastroesophageal reflux.

Figure 26-23 Construction of anterior thoracic esophagostomy. When esophageal disruption warrants total esophageal diversion, the intrathoracic esophagus should be mobilized well into the neck through the thoracic incision, and the esophagus should then be delivered out of the neck wound and placed on the anterior chest wall. Viability of the remaining esophagus is maintained through collateral circulation from the inferior thyroid arteries. The esophagus should be tunneled subcutaneously and an anterior thoracic esophagostomy constructed. It is much easier to apply a stomal appliance to the flat surface of the upper chest than to the usual location of a cervical esophagostomy. The remaining esophageal length can be used to advantage when alimentary continuity is reestablished at a later date. (From Orringer, M.B.: Complications of esophageal surgery and trauma. In Greenfield, L.J. [ed.]: Complications in Surgery and Trauma, 2nd ed. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1990, p. 302, with permission.)

Figure 26-24 Postoperative barium swallow after esophagectomy and an intrathoracic esophagogastric anastomosis for carcinoma. The patient has impaired gastric emptying due to two technical errors: (1) failure to enlarge the diaphragmatic hiatus sufficiently (large arrow), and (2) failure to perform a gastric drainage procedure (the small arrow indicates an obstructed gastric outlet). (From Orringer, M.B.: Complications of esophageal surgery and trauma. In Greenfield, L.J. fed. J: Complications in Surgery and Trauma. Philadelphia, J.B. Lippincott, 1984, p. 276, with permission.)

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Virtual Gastric Banding

Virtual Gastric Banding

Virtual Gastric Band Hypnosis Audio Programm that teaches your mind to use only the right amount of food to keep you slim. The Virtual Gastric Band is applied using mind management techniques, giving you the experience of undergoing surgery to install a virtual gastric band or virtual lap-band, creating a small pouch at the top of the stomach which limits how much food can be eaten. Once installed, the Virtual Gastric Band creates the sensation of having a smaller stomach that is easily filled and satisfied with smaller amounts of food.

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