Reference Set Fungal Spores

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R. A. Samson and J. I. Pitt, eds., Harwood Academic Publishers, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2000, pp. 285-298.

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13. Morey, P., Microbiological investigations of indoor environments: interpreting sample data-selected case studies, in Microorganisms in Home and Indoor Work Environments, B. Flannigan, R. A. Samson, and J. D. Miller, eds., Taylor & Francis, London and New York, 2001, pp. 275-284.

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