Combination of Hemoglobin with Carbon Monoxide Displacement of Oxygen

Carbon monoxide combines with hemoglobin at the same point on the hemoglobin molecule as does oxygen; it can therefore displace oxygen from the hemoglobin, thereby decreasing the oxygen carrying capacity of blood. Further, it binds with about 250 times as much tenacity as oxygen, which is demonstrated by the carbon monoxide-hemoglobin dissociation curve in Figure 40-12. This curve is almost identical to the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve, except that the carbon monoxide partial pressures, shown on the abscissa, are at a level 1/250 of those for the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve of Figure 40-8. Therefore, a carbon monoxide partial pressure of only 0.4 mm Hg in the alveoli, 1/250 that of normal alveolar oxygen (100 mm Hg Po2), allows the carbon monoxide to compete equally with the oxygen for combination with the hemoglobin and causes half the hemoglobin in the blood to become bound with carbon monoxide instead of with oxygen. Therefore, a carbon monoxide pressure of only

Hemoglobin And Carbon Monoxide
Figure 40-12

Capillary

Capillary

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Lose Weight Today With Yoga

Lose Weight Today With Yoga

Want to lose weight but don't know where to start? Transform Your Life With The Knowledge Of The Yogi's And Begin Losing Weight Today. This guide is one of the most valuable resources you can have when learning about yoga to lose weight.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment